Panels by Track

Track A - Pittsburgh's Role (Past, Present, and Future) in Pursuit of Civil Rights

Pittsburgh's Role (Past, Present, and Future) in Pursuit of Civil Rights (Track A)

Thursday, 9:30-10:45 a.m.

Leon Haley and Sala Udin, Moderators
  • Leon L. Haley, Professor Emeritus, University of Pittsburgh
  • Sala Udin, Former City Council Member, City of Pittsburgh
  • Morton Coleman, Director Emeritus, Institute of Politics, and Professor Emeritus, School of Social Work, University of Pittsburgh
  • Marisa Bartley, Business Development Officer, Citizens Financial Group, and Eastern Region Vice President, National Urban League Young Professionals
This panel will address the pursuit of the civil rights movement in Pittsburgh during its height in the mid-20th century, with a focus on its accomplishments and its shortcomings.  Further, it will assess the current status of the movement, with particular focus on the adverse impact of such social equity issues as the disparate rate of black unemployment, educational outcomes, the weak economic base of black neighborhoods, and police-black community relations. An important dimension of the track will be a discussion on what efforts and strategies must be undertaken to advance this broader social equity agenda facing the city over the next 50 years.



Funding for Social Equity and Civil Rights - Philanthropy's Unfinished Work Then and Now (Track A)

Thursday, 9:30-10:45 a.m.

Kathleen Buechel, Moderator 


  • Kathleen Buechel, Director of the Philanthropy Forum, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh; and the Benter Foundation

  • Phillip Hallen, Executive Director Emeritus, Falk Foundation
  • Lucy Dabney, CEO and Executive Director, Program to Aid Citizen Enterprise
  • Mark Lewis, CEO and Executive Director, POISE Foundation
  • Carmen Anderson, Senior Program Officer, Heinz Endowments
The panel will discuss how Pittsburgh's philanthropic sector funded and approached the quest for civil rights and social equity in the 1960s during the war on poverty and again today following the great recession.  Panel members are foundation and civic leaders who were active in the 1960s as well as funders presently involved in this still unfinished and important work.  Philanthropy's approaches, successes and shortfalls will be examined along with exploration of how voluntary private resources were and can be invested for greater public good, and what lessons can be gleaned to guide contemporary work. Topics may include: issues which shape the philanthropic agenda; how regional funders connect with national funders and leaders in other sectors; addressing inequities in education, community development, poverty, and family support then and now; effect of regulation and public policy on framing philanthropy’s work regarding The Civil Rights Act, welfare reform, greenlining initiatives, and the Affordable Care Act. 

 

Track B - Shaping Social Equity through Immigration Policy

Immigrants and the City: Initiatives to Close the Equity Gap (Track B)

Friday, 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Marcela Gonzalez Rivas, Moderator


  • Marcela Gonzalez Rivas, Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh
  • Patricia Documét, Assistant Professor; Scientific Director, Center for Health Equity; Director, Graduate Certificate in Health Equity Behavioral and Community Health Sciences, University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health; Key member of the Latino Engagement Group for Salud (LEGS)

  • Marco Gemignani, Associate Professor of Psychology, McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts, Duquesne University
  • Barbara Murock, Health Policy Specialist and Immigrants and Internationals Initiative Manager, Allegheny County Department of Human Services
  • Sister Janice Vanderneck, Director, Casa San Jose for Latino migrants in Brookline
  • Rose Maria Ponciano, Director, Latino Family Center

This panel will explore the ways in which social programs and services, as well as planning initiatives, can modify or improve the marginalized status of some immigrant groups in the Pittsburgh region and similar urban areas. 


Track C - The Affordable Care Act's Role and Potential in Creating Equal Access to Health Care

The Affordable Care Act's Role and Potential in Creating Equal Access to Health Care (Track C)

Friday, 9:30 a.m.-10:45 a.m.

William N. Dunn, Moderator


  • William N. Dunn, Professor, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University if Pittsburgh

  • Joanne Corte Grossi, Regional Director, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
  • Rhonda Moore Johnson, Senior Medical Director, Health Equity & Quality Services, Highmark Incorporated, "Highmark's Approach to Achieving Health Equity" 
  • Schnequa N. Diggs, PhD Student of Public Policy and Administration, Florida Atlantic University, "Surviving Political and Legal Land Mines: ACA's Promise towards a
  • Health Care Transformation" - This paper will discuss the implementation of the Affordable Care Act and its potential for creating equal access to healthcare through insurance coverage mandates, strengthening primary care, improving health information technology, new payment models for patient care, adoption of national quality standards and improving disparity monitoring and accountability. This paper will also discuss the foundation of deservedness of our nation and its role in health policy.

Track D - The Unfinished Work of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Equitable Community Development (Track D)

Thursday, 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Sabina Deitrick, Moderator
  • Sabina Deitrick, Associate Professor and Co-Director, University Center for Social and Urban Research, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh
  • Dennis Keating, Levin College Distinguished Professor and Director of the Master of Urban Planning, Design and Development (MUPDD) Program, Levin College of Urban Affairs, Cleveland State University
  • Tracy Soska, Assistant Professor and Director of Continuing Education (CE), School of Social Work, University of Pittsburgh 
  • George Moses, Outreach & Enrollment Specialist, East Liberty Family Health Care Center
This panel examines the status of the American Dream 50 years after the passage of the Civil Rights Act along a variety of topics, including: economic mobility/income inequality, homelessness, disaffected youth, and more.



Growing Inequities: An Analysis of Social Challenges (Track D)

Thursday, 2:15-3:30 p.m.

Jade Berry James, Moderator


  • Jade M. Berry James, Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Programs, Department of Public Administration, North Carolina State University (NCSU), "The Role of Government in Sustaining Social Equity & Promoting Justice: Avenues to Access, Diversity and Inclusion"
  • Susan Gichora Mwarabu, Graduate Student, North Carolina State University
  • Emily Nwakpuda, PhD student, University of North Carolina
  • Cryshanna A. Jackson, Associate Professor and Urban Internship Coordinator, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, Youngstown State University, "Gender Equity in College Athletics"
Social Equity continues to be a focal point when issues of fair and just distribution of services are brought up. This panel will be analyzing government initiatives that broaden access, opportunity and fairness for students, immigrants and low income residents. Participants will gain a broader understanding of the role that policy agents can play in infusing social equity in policy creation as well as in the management and delivery of services.

New and Continuing Challenges Confronting Vulnerable Populations (Track D)

Friday, 8:00-9:15 a.m.

Leon Haley, Moderator


  • Amy Gawne, Senior Policy Analyst, Office of Policy and Planning, Department of Veterans Affairs, presenting with S.C. Smith (below)-- A discussion of the relationship between social equity and income inequality as it related to veteran outcomes across select cohorts and demographics; the interrelationship of income, employment, health, education, and environmental factors; and the unique challenges that veterans face, particularly during reintegration
  • Stephen C. Smith, Senior Policy Analyst, Office of Policy and Planning, Department of Veterans Affairs, “Social Equity and Income Inequality in the Veteran Community” with A. Gawne (see abstract immediately above)
  • Ramona Ortega-Liston, Associate Professor, Department of Public Administration and Urban Studies, University of Akron, “Latinos, Civil Rights, and Representative Bureaucracy—A Historical & Contemporary Perspective” – The historic 1964 Civil Rights legislation has been the law of the land for 50 years.  The question now becomes what has it meant for Latinos, Blacks, and women?
  • Grant Rissler, PhD Student, Public Policy and Administration, Virginia Commonwealth University, "Immigrants and the Contemporary White Racial Frame: Evidence from Letters to the Editor of a Southern Daily Newspaper" - The paper juxtaposes Moral Foundations Theory (proposed by Haidt 2012) and Critical Race Theory (explained by, among others, Feagin, 2009) as differing but sometimes complimentary explanations for foundational cognitive framing and hypothesizes that evidence of both will be found in the attitudes about immigrants and immigration expressed in the public forum of letters to the editor of a southern daily newspaper. Elements of both theories are operationalized in order to perform an exploratory content analysis of the most recent 10 years of immigration-related letters and the results are reported and discussed.
  • Mona Siddiqui, PhD Student, Public Policy and Administration, Virginia Commonwealth University, "The Role of Race in Asylum Laws, Policies, and Practices: Oppression of our Most Vulnerable Immigrant Population" - This study assesses the racialization of immigrants throughout American history, evaluates asylum laws and policies that restrict and limit the civil and procedural rights of asylum seekers, and investigates the role of micro-aggression in asylum officers' and immigration judges' adjudication of asylum cases.


Track E - The New Work of a Civil Rights Act of 2014

Conquering Racial Inequity in the Public Sector – A Book Talk (Track E)

Wednesday, 10:45 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

  • Susan T. Gooden, Professor and Executive Director, The Grace E. Harris Leadership Institute, Virginia Commonwealth University, Race and Social Equity: A Nervous Area of Government
  • James D. Ward, Professor of Political Science and Coordinator of Public Administration Certificate Program, Mississippi University for Women, Institutional Racism, Organizations and Public Policy
The authors will discuss their recently published (2014) books in the area of race and social equity.  S. Gooden, in her book, contends that social equity, specifically racial equity, is a “nervous area of government” which, over the course of history, has stifled many individuals and organizations, thus leading to an inability to seriously advance the reduction of racial inequities in government.  J. Ward’s book addresses institutional racism in public administration and public affairs education, in relation to the cognate fields of public policy and political science.  Institutional racism is defined as a complex of embedded, systemic practices that disadvantage ethno-racial minority groups.  



The American Dream 50 Years Later (Track E)

Thursday, 8:00-9:15 a.m.

Heather Wyatt-Nichol, Moderator


  • Heather Wyatt-Nichol, MPA Program Director and Assistant Professor, College of Public Affairs, University of Baltimore, "Contrasting the American Promise and the American Dream"
  • Renita Seabrook, Assistant Professor, School of Criminal Justice, University of Baltimore
  • Tiffaney Parkman, Lecturer, School of Health and Human Services, University of Baltimore, "The UB Homeless Project: Learning Community”
  • Nelson Scott, “Where are the Black Warren Buffetts?”
  • Kenneth Weaver, MPA Student, University of Baltimore, “A New Civil Rights Act for All Americans” - The Civil Rights Act of 1964 does not need more amendments; the true justice inherent in Dr. King’s Dream requires an expansive, new effort that is unprecedented in both depth and reach.
This panel examines the status of the American Dream 50 years after the passage of the Civil Rights Act along a variety of topics, including: economic mobility/income inequality, homelessness, disaffected youth, and more.



Social Equity in Disaster Environments (Track E) Friday, 8:00-9:15 p.m.

Brian Colella, Moderator

  • Alvin Henderson, Chief, Allegheny County Emergency Services
  • Glenn Cannon, Director, Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency
  • Brian Colella, Deputy Fire Chief, Airport Rescue and Fire Fighting Department, Pittsburgh International Airport and PhD Candidate, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh
  • Angela Reynolds, Director, Programs for Financially Struggling Adults and Families, United Way of Allegheny County
  • Richard B. Wilson, Chief, Airport Rescue and Fire Fighting Department, Pittsburgh International Airport

A Freedom Budget for All Americans: Its History and Relevance for Today (Track E)

Friday, 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Paul LeBlanc, Moderator


  • Paul LeBlanc, Professor of History and Political Science, La Roche College
  • Carl Redwood, Chair, One Hill Coalition
In this panel historian Paul LeBlanc will present a slide show focused on the historical context and specifics of the Freedom Budget as it was advanced by A. Philip Randolph, Bayard Rustin, Martin Luther King, and others.  Carl Redwood, who has a rich history of community organizing, will focus on aspects of the contemporary relevance of the Freedom Budget.  


Track F - Assessing the Relation between Growing Income Inequality and Social Equity

Not Just a U.S. Issue: Comparative Social Equity Challenges (Track F)

Thursday, 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Susan T. Gooden, Moderator


  • Susan T. Gooden, Incoming President of ASPA and Professor and Executive Director, Grace E. Harris Leadership Institute, L. Douglas Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Yolanda Macklin Crewe, PhD Student, Public Policy and Administration, Virginia Commonwealth University, "Pay Equity: A Comparative Analysis of the United States, United Arab Emirates, and Mexico"
  • Susan Holtzman, MPA Student, Virginia Commonwealth University, “Employment Inequity: A Comparative Analysis of the Impact of Criminal Records on Employment Options in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom”
  • Michael Scott, PhD Candidate, School of Education, Virginia Commonwealth University, “Promoting Equitable access to Higher Education for Low-income Students: A Comparative Study of the United States, China, and Costa Rica”
  • Marta Squadrito, PhD student, Public Policy and Administration, Virginia Commonwealth University, “Refugee Policies: A Comparative Analysis of the United States, Italy and Israel”
This panel offers a comparative examination of how social equity is defined. Then, the presentations identify social equity commonalities and differences across 6-8 developed and developing nations. It concludes with an examination of some of the challenges involved in doing comparative social equity analysis, while highlighting the need to advance research in this growing frontier of social equity scholarship. 



Approaching Economic Inequality through Deliberative Democracy (Track F)

Friday, 9:30-10:45 a.m.

Robert Cavalier, Moderator


  • Robert Cavalier, Carnegie Mellon Program for Deliberative Democracy, Carnegie Mellon University
  • William Friedman, President, Public Agenda
  • William Muse, President, National Issues Forums Institute (NIFI)
  • Carolyne Abdullah, Director of Community Assistance, Everyday Democracy

The 74%: Exploring the Lives of Women in Nonprofit Organizations (Track F)

Friday, 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Peggy Morrison Outon, Moderator


  • Peggy Morrison Outon, Executive Director, Bayer Center for Nonprofit Management, Robert Morris University
  • Carrie Tancraitor, Consultant and Researcher, Bayer Center for Nonprofit Management, Robert Morris University
  • William Stein, C Suite, Interim Leadership and Consulting
A reality exists in nonprofit organizations, which are supposed to be the bastions of social justice:  That justice seems too often attempted for those served, not the people who are serving, including the 74% who happen to be women. The panel will discuss efforts to see clearly these issues and to build a more just future for the 74%.  Other panelists will be representative of key issue areas and will tell their own stories of work and effort in the nonprofit sector.


Track G - (In) Equality of Educational Opportunities?

The State of Education in America: Three Steps Forward, Two Steps Back (Track G)

Thursday, 8:00-9:15 a.m.

Linda Blake, Moderator


  • Linda Blake, Assistant Professor of Public Administration, South Arkansas University, "The Impact of School Consolidation/Annexation Policies on Disadvantaged Populations: A Case Study Examining Equity Issues" - The purpose of this research study is to examine equity issues involved when schools are forced or required to annex or consolidate by state officials. This study examines the school annexation transition for two rural predominantly African American school districts in Arkansas and equity issues involved in the process.
  • Tiffany D. Wilkins, Graduate and Teaching Assistant, School of Education, Duquesne University, "Transformative Blackness: Queering the African American Educational Establishment for LGBTQ Youth of Color" - An Improvement Science research approach to black educational leadership, cultural institutions and networks as three organized, managed and monitored systems in the culturally systemic construct of "blackness" shaping traditionally, historically and predominantly African American educational systems and the longitudinal educational access, goals and outcome effects for LGBTQ youth of color.
  • Lindsey L. Evans, Administrative Program Coordinator, The Grace E. Harris Leadership Institute, Virginia Commonwealth University, "An Appeal for HOPE: Analyses and Social Equity Implications of Georgia's Non-need, Merit-based Lottery Funded Scholarship" - This study examines the characteristics of students who have received the HOPE merit-based scholarship. While the HOPE Scholarship is merit based, it is funded from the Georgia lottery which is disproportionately based on contributions from minorities. To what extent do the communities who support the lottery (and thereby the HOPE Scholarship) also receive the educational scholarship benefits? This research will provide a social equity analysis of the HOPE scholarship program.
  • Kasey J. Martin, Research Associate, The Grace E. Harris Leadership Institute, Virginia Commonwealth University, "Implementing Social Equity in the Public Sector: How Community Colleges Achieve the Dream" – This study examines the issue of social equity within community colleges as this equity is essential for the promotion of student success within the postsecondary system of most relevance to underserved student populations. 

Layered Inequalities in Education: Challenges and Opportunities(Track G)

Thursday, 9:30-10:45 a.m.

Dr. Jessie B. Ramey, Moderator


  • Dr. Jessie B. Ramey, Visiting Scholar, Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies Program, University of Pittsburgh
  • Dr. Kathy M. Newman, Associate Professor of English and Media Studies at Carnegie Mellon University, "High Stakes Testing and Inequality"
  • Donald G. Block, Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council, "Inequality of Educational Opportunities: Adult Skills and their Implications for U.S. Policy"
  • David A. Bell, Assistant Professor of Public Administration, Savannah State University, “Sanguine Savannah and School Supply Symmetry” – This research examines the connection between available resources and income inequality in Savannah public primary education.  Where results-oriented public administration places greater discretion in the hands of street level bureaucrats providing the prescribed results, the adage “it’s about the money” underscores important questions about results and fairness in public service delivery. 
  • Julianne Norman, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh, "Gendered Inequalities in Education in Morocco: Creative Alternatives to Traditional Schooling"

This panel examines issues of educational equity for underserved populations. Panelists will discuss constraints that limit these population groups’ access to and matriculation at institutions of higher learning. They will also suggest steps that can be taken to provide individuals from these groups more opportunities for success. 



Thorough and Efficient? Equitable School Funding: A Call for Action (Track G)

Thursday, 2:15-3:30 p.m.

Maureen McClure and Harold Aughton, Moderators


  • Maureen McClure, Associate Professor, School of Education, University of Pittsburgh
  • Harold Aughton, PhD Student, School of Education, University of Pittsburgh
  • Jessie Ramey, ACLS New Faculty Fellow, Women’s Studies and History, University of Pittsburgh
  • Joseph F. Lagana, Founder and CEO, Homeless Children's Education Fund

Educational Equity: Issues of Preparedness, Access and Matriculation (Track G)

Friday, 8:00-9:15 a.m.

Harvey White, Moderator

  • Harvey White, Associate Professor, Graduate School of Public and International Administration, University of Pittsburgh
  • H. Richard Milner IV, Director, Urban Education Center, University of Pittsburgh
  • Chenits Pettigrew, Assistant Dean of Student Affairs and Director of Diversity Programs, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
  • Blue Wooldridge, Professor of Public Administration, L. Douglas Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Sylvester Murray, Visiting Professor, Jackson State University

This panel examines issues of educational equity for underserved populations. Panelists will discuss constraints that limit these population groups’ access to and matriculation at institutions of higher learning. They will also suggest steps that can be taken to provide individuals from these groups more opportunities for success. 


Track H - Social Equity through the Lens of Economics and Psychology

Economic History of Disenfranchisement (Track H)

Thursday, 8:00-9:15 a.m.

Lovie Jackson Foster, Moderator


  • Lovie Jackson Foster, Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, University of Pittsburgh
  • T. Rashad Byrdsong, President, Community Empowerment Association, "Historical Disenfranchisement and its Impact on Black Americans"
  • Daniel Jones, Assistant Professor, Darla Moore School of Business, University of South Carolina, "A Poll Tax by Any Other Name: The Political Economy of Post-Reconstruction Disenfranchisement" – The goal in this paper is not only to provide quantitative evidence on the relative role formal and informal institutions played in disenfranchising blacks during the nineteenth and early twentieth century, but also to address a set of questions about the political economy of black disenfranchisement that previous scholars have largely ignored or economists have only just started to consider. 
  • Tate Twinam, PhD Student, University of Pittsburgh, "Race, Ethnicity, and Zoning: The Case of Chicago's First Comprehensive Land Use Ordinance?" - In 1923, Chicago adopted one of the nation’s first comprehensive zoning ordinances. Intended to stabilize property values and protect public health by regulating land uses and building types, the ordinance made no mention of race or ethnicity. We ask if, despite the race-neutral text, minority communities were differentially zoned. Using fine-resolution spatial data on the location of immigrants and African Americans across Chicago juxtaposed with digitized maps of contemporaneous land use and the zoning ordinance itself, we show that neighborhoods with either a larger share of southern blacks or first-generation immigrants were more likely to be zoned for manufacturing uses. The results are robust to the inclusion of a rich set of controls for urban geography and pre-existing land uses, suggesting that our findings cannot be explained by the sorting of minorities into areas most suited for industrial activity
In this panel, economist D. Jones from the University of South Carolina, and T. Twinam from the University of Pittsburgh will be presenting quantitative evidence of formal and informal institutions that disenfranchised minority communities during the early 1900s (poll taxes and zoning laws).  Community organizer T.R. Byrdsong will present his perspective on the intergenerational effects of past events on present day African American communities and potential ways forward.  



The Economics of Life on the Streets (Track H)

Thursday, 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Brendan O’Flaherty, Moderator


  • Dionissi Aliprantis, Research Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland
  • Sera Linardi, Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh, "Savings Behavior at the Homeless Shelter" 
  • Brendan O'Flaherty, Professor, Economics Department, Columbia University
What do the challenges of individuals on the streets say about achieving social equity more generally?  In this panel, D. Aliprantis will translate ethnographic research on “code on the street” to quantitative evidence about human capital accumulation in the inner city.  S. Linardi will present her field experiment studying asset accumulation of the homeless population while housed in traditional shelters.  B. O’Flaherty will moderate and present his own work on crime and poverty, bringing many years of experience bridging local government and academia.  

Public Psychology in Communication of Risk and Uncertainty (Track H)

Thursday, 2:15-3:30 p.m.

Monica Schoch-Spana, Moderator


  • Christopher Olivola, Assistant Professor of Marketing, Tepper School of Business, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Stephen Broomell, Assistant Professor, Social and Decision Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Monica Schoch-Spana, Senior Associate, UPMC Center for Health Security
How do humans respond to public communication about risk and disaster?  C. Olivola, a psychologist, will discuss our reaction to human death tolls while S. Broomell will present evidence on public interpretation of reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).  Medical anthropologist M. Schoch-Spana, who has served multiple national advisory roles in emergency preparedness, will present her own work and moderate this discussion.  



Equal Treatment under the Law: Economic Analysis of Same-Sex Benefits Post Windsor (Track H)

Friday, 9:30-10:45 a.m.

Lorenda A. Naylor, Moderator


  • Lorenda A. Naylor, Government and Public Policy Director, School of Public & International Affairs, University of Baltimore
  • Dan Gerlowski, Professor of Economics, Merrick School of Business, University of Baltimore
  • Wallace K. Swan, Adjunct Professor, Hamline University and Walden University
Unequal treatment of same sex married couples across states creates inequities and unjust outcomes from a social equity perspective; it also creates a fiscal impact in terms of changing spending and private capital (wealth) accumulation.  This fiscal impact generates an inefficiency resulting in a social cost for the economy as a whole.  In addition to channeling spending power away from some same sex married couples in the form of insurance premiums, federal benefit reduction, income, etc., the inefficiency also thwarts incentives which married same sex couples have to accumulate wealth.  



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